Tag Archive for: Keywords

Long-Tail Keywords: What are they?

Are you tired of trying to rank for the two or three-tail high-competition keywords as your competitors? Long-tail keywords could be the answer. What are long-tail keywords and how do they work in search marketing? Let’s find out!

Targeted keywords filled with intent can help you reach your target audience. If they’re clicking to your site from the search engines, chances are they’re finding you through longtail keywords. Let us break down how to use long-tail keywords for your business’ benefit.

What are Long-Tail Keywords?

Long-tail keywords are specific search queries that tend to have relatively low search volumes. They make up a large percentage of overall searches when added together. The term long-tail was coined to describe the phenomenon of niche products becoming a top seller.

The term “long tail” refers to the tail at the end of a curve when looking at keyword searches on Google. Long-tail keywords are specific but least-searched. A head keyword is typically a broad term when it comes to searching for a product/brand.

Here are a few examples of long-tail keywords vs. head keywords:

Head Keyword:

Nike

Long Tail Keywords:

Nike Air Max Ones

Nike sustainability policy

Vintage Nike shoes

Nike Men’s Yoga Shorts

While exact length doesn’t matter, long-tail keywords are typically at least three words in length due to their specificity.

Why Are Long-Tail Keywords Important?

Head terms are competitive, especially the popular ones. This in turn, makes it difficult for them to rank well with SEO. By using long-tail keywords you’re able to differentiate your business and services while having fewer to compete with to rank on the first page of Google.

Long-tail keywords can help you get more out of your advertising return on investment. High-volume keywords have a high cost per click, but they don’t convert well. Low-volume keywords are highly targeted and therefore have a higher conversion rate.

Using Long-Tail Keywords Effectively

Finding a good long-tail keyword is only part of the heavy task at hand. Once you’ve found your desired keywords, you need to use them strategically on your page. Here are a few on-page SEO tips that apply specifically to long-tail keywords:

  1. Using keywords naturally
  2. Placing keywords strategically
  3. Consider your user’s search intent

Final thoughts

The foundation of any successful SEO campaign is keyword research. In addition to long-tail keyword strategies and other digital marketing updates, we will continue to share case studies and the latest SEO updates to help you drive your business. Our goal is to ensure we help improve your marketing and drive success.

At Onimod Global, we have endless experience and expertise when it comes to all things SEO, general social media advertising, and digital marketing. Got questions about keywords or want to learn more about our services? Contact us here today.

How to Enhance Your SEO with Keywords

If you don’t understand how to use keywords for search engine optimization (SEO), you’re losing business. Follow these suggestions and watch your website rise the ranks to the top of search-engine results. 

Keywords are words and phrases typed into search engines like google, to find information on a certain topic. Keywords are known as SEO keywords, keyphrases and search queries. While they may have different names, they all do the same thing. If you want to enhance your SEO, keywords are the way to go.

Here is what you need to know about keywords and how to use them in order to get your content ranking at the top of Google’s results.

What Are Keywords Known For?

Keywords are essentially the foundation of SEO and pay-for-click (PPC) in marketing campaigns. If you want to enhance your SEO, then ranking at the top of Google should be your number one priority. Having targets for a keyword can bring you quality website traffic that will generate into leads, and hopefully new clients.

If your marketing budget allows, invest in some pay-per-click ads to get your website organic results. With Google Ads, advertisers bid to appear at the top of search results for specific keywords. Keywords that signal someone is ready to buy could be good choices for a paid search campaign.

A good example would running an ad for a home appliances business. In that case, the keyword “washer for sale in Chicago” is a term that someone close to buying would search for. On the other hand, running a search like “best washers” is for someone just beginning their search on the buying cycle. Overall, it would be better to use an SEO keyword that would optimize a blog post around. 

How to Find Keywords for SEO

The keywords you choose can either improve your SEO or do the opposite. If you use keywords that are too competitive, you will have a hard time getting a good ranking in Google. If you optimize your website around keywords that your target audience does not search for you will end up with traffic that won’t generate the leads you want. If your business is new, you want to shift your focus to long-tail keywords. These are simply specific search terms with low search volume.

The benefits of using long-tail keywords is that it tends to convert at a much higher rate than high search volume terms do. This is due to people using long-tail keywords to buy something specific. Another good example of this would be using a keyword like, “Volkswagen Dealership in Chicago.” Its a specific keyword with a specific location.

Qualities of a Keyword

When doing keyword research, what are some of the things you pay attention to? These qualities say a lot about how your keywords will perform. The overall main qualities of a keyword should include the following:

  • Search Volume
  • Competition
  • Cost-per-click
  • Word Count

These 4 qualities all do different things for you in terms of keyword searches. Let’s break down what each one mean and how they can benefit your SEO strategy. 

  1. Search volume relates to the number of times a keyword is search in google each month. This helps you estimate how much traffic you can get if you rank keywords in Google.
  2. Competition relates to the more sought-after keywords that are likely used on many websites but you’re competing to be at the top, both organically and paid. A great way to take on this quality is by having keyword difficulty and competitive density. Keyword Difficulty helps you manage your SEO campaign, and Competitive Density helps you prioritize your advertising campaign.
  3. Cost-per-click shows you how much it costs an adversiter every time someone clicks on their ad after doing a keyword search. If you are planning an ad campaign, evaluating cost-per-click of your target keywords is essential when you’re trying to estimate how much the campaign will cost you.
  4. Word Count is the number of words that make up 1 keyword. If we go back to the example of “Volkswagen dealership in Chicago” that keyword would have the word count of four. Word count is a helpful way to narrow your research. The higher the word count, the more specific the search.

Last Thoughts

Keywords are extremely beneficial to anyone’s SEO strategy when used correctly. By following the steps above, you are putting yourself in a great position to outrank your competitors.

Onimod Global is your Chicago-based, in-house marketing team, your partner experts for specific marketing verticals or some nice balance in between. We excel in customer service and will teach you the most relevant and up-to-date digital marketing skills. From social media to SEO and paid search, you will have the tools to ensure your business succeeds online.

Have questions about creating your online presence and need help strategizing? Contact us here today.

Content Marketing & SEO

SEO and content marketing are made for each other. A lot of people are confused about SEO and content marketing. Neither works well on its own, but, together they are a powerhouse for internet marketing. Let’s take a quick look at the importance of each and then how they work together.

SEO and content marketing go hand in hand. Without each other you would not be able to fuel your potential online success. As a quick recap, it’s important to know the terms before we dive into SEO and Content Marketing.

SEO Basics

SEO (search engine optimization) is a way to improve the position of a page in search engine results by tweaking on-page and off-page factors.

Search engine traffic can be maximized by:

  • Optimizing pages until they appear on the 1st page of search results
  • Claiming special features like the local search map results or search snippets
  • Getting links into other high-traffic content

Content Marketing Basics

Content marketing is a way to use content to create interest or trust. Advantages of content marketing include:

  • May provide a lot of long-term value: The content created for these campaigns can be so effective that it can get shared for years in emails, lists of top guides, and social media channels. This kind of exposure isn’t vulnerable to sudden search engine updates.
  • Supports your brand: One of the benefits of content marketing is that providing solid information is always good for your reputation. Communicating helps customers know where you stand. The communicating you do during content marketing has a lasting impact on your brand.

Whereas content marketing is focused on using valuable and relevant content to drive customer and client action that in turn, becomes profitable. The most important thing to remember about the two is that SEO is strategized around content marketing. Every website needs words, substance, keywords and images in order to be successful.

Here’s a look at Content Marketing & SEO and what you need to know.

Keywords

The key to SEO is researching and finding relevant keywords and making use of them in your content so they rank higher in the search engine results pages, also known as, SERPs. You should avoid filling a page with keywords and over optimizing. In order for SEO and content to work, you need to find a balance between the two.

Keyword strategies are imperative for effective search engine marketing (SEM). Embedding target keywords is essential to rank well and boost traffic. Follow a strategy and avoid stuffing them in the content. Repeating keywords has a negative impact on SEO. Follow a reasonable approach and use the main keywords in the title and body section.

Quality Content

SEO and content marketing require consistency. Fresh, unique and creative content gets indexed quickly and ranks higher than low-value and repetitive content. Your content should be able to lure in your clients as well as solve a particular issue. One can write influential content by using important keywords and targeting visitors. 

This is the most important factor, where Google determines the relevance of a page and ranks a piece of content. By understanding the purpose of the page you’ll be able to better understand what criteria goes into evaluating that page for quality. 

User Experience

SEO is significantly more than just blogs, keywords and backlinks. It is equal parts, enhancing metadata and using the appropriate tags. It is also part of creating an experience for the user that is enjoyable. Optimizing URLs and making the slug everything after the (.com) concise, drives the search engine to find the relevant subpages and categorize the different parts of your site. This is crucial to the success of any SEO campaign. Technical optimization plays a key role and makes a web page appealing to the search engine and ensures that the site has no broken links and no error codes. Otherwise, it will be poorly ranked by the search engine. 

Header tags and title tags benefit the user by strategizing the content in a way that is useful and simple for readers to understand. A good title tag ensures a great user experience because the visitor can recognize the information from the page before they actually click on it. 

Final Thoughts

The biggest takeaway from this article is when Content Marketing & SEO work together in harmony you’ll see online success. Your Content marketing will only be as successful if it is properly paired with the appropriate SEO. 

At Onimod Global, we have endless experience and expertise when it comes to all things SEO, expanding your social presence and digital marketing. Got questions about how to develop a digital marketing strategy for 2022 or want to learn more about us? Contact us here today.

5 Google Ads Campaign Tips for 2021

Is your 2021 resolution to improve your Google Ads campaigns and increase your overall business profitability? As marketers, it’s important to maintain control over our strategies and campaigns. Google’s optimizations are not always in the best interests of our business, they also don’t exactly know the context of our brands. To succeed in the upcoming year, we must try new things and change our strategies and tactics. We have to integrate more data, retain control over automatic Google optimizations and fight against increased competition. 

Here are 5 things to do and focus on in 2021 to improve your Google Ads campaigns. 

1. Have keyword intent. 

Google always favors consistency with campaigns. The more similar performance your keywords have, usually the better the campaign will perform overall. When selecting keywords, user intent should be the top priority around which we group our keywords. 

Users who have searched for the name of your brand are obviously more likely to convert once they make it to your website. So, any keywords relating to your brand should be grouped together since they bring the best CPA and ROAS. Any keywords mentioning “price” or “discount” are strong signals of purchasing intent as well. Phrases including “specifications,” “size” or “warranty” are important to bid on, but CTR and CR are likely to be lower, so you want to reduce your bid. 

If you want to improve results, it’s important to visualize and quantify areas in which you can improve things and find new business. The trick is to structure your account appropriately. This can be a tedious and complicated process, but there are a number of tools that can assist you. 

2. Declutter your campaigns. 

Keeping a close eye on all aspects of your campaigns can seem overwhelming, yet it can be key to success. Any underperforming spend represents the portion of your Google Ads investment that either has a low quality score or isn’t converting enough. To reduce waste spend, it’s important to focus on two Google reports: Quality Score and Search Query Report. This will help you analyze the search terms that trigger your ads and identify where to increase and decrease spend. 

3. Identify and double down on your strengths. 

It’s a common misconception that bidding on new keywords automatically leads to increasing sales. While this is sometimes true, it’s more effective to make sure you have the maximum market share on the keywords that are your most profitable, beyond just branded traffic. 

The best way to ensure you don’t miss out on any opportunity is to monitor your impression share on Google Ad SEPRs. Lost impressions relate to missed opportunities on searches related to the keywords you bid on. Best practice includes focusing on your top 10 campaigns and checking the market shares of your competitors, monitoring closely when you’re not shown and identifying why that might be. 

4. Use high quality creatives. 

Ad copy and visuals obviously play a huge role in your campaigns. Users are exposed to more than 6000 ads daily, so standing out and grabbing attention is essential. The quality of creative weighs up to 80% in the performance of Facebook Ads campaigns and the case is similar for Google Ads. Optimizing ads and creatives includes giving in to statistics. It’s impossible to know for sure which creatives will perform best without testing multiple versions. It’s also important to continuously test ads. Even when you identify a clear winner in one test, create new versions to continue to test to ensure you’re always increasing your ad performance. 

5. Spend smarter, not more. 

Spend should be allocated not only on keywords or placement levels, but user profiles also need to be taken into account. Data is gathered from users’ declarative info, when and where they’re active online, as well as Google Analytics shared data and inferred data from previous search queries. It’s important to take these user profiles into consideration and make bid adjustments to your most valuable audiences and criteria. 

More from Onimod Global 

At Onimod Global we’re experts in all areas of Google Ads. If you’re looking for digital marketing assistance, we can help your business reach its full digital potential. Interested in growing digital presence for your company? Reach out to us here!

Onimod Global releases the latest digital marketing news and essential marketing tips every Tuesday and Thursday! To catch up on the top digital marketing news and trends, click here. To find out more about who we are and what we do, click here.

How to Develop the Most Effective Keyword Strategy

The development of keyword strategies has changed drastically over time. Back in the day (AKA 5 to 10 years ago), a common goal among search marketers was to obtain as many keywords as possible. The number of keywords in your account was something to respect about a marketer in that time and today that has remarkably changed. Instead of focusing on the quantity of keywords, the emphasis is centered now on the quality of what keywords you want to target. The experts here at Onimod Global have a few do’s and don’ts you can implement into your keyword strategy.

Do: Identify themes.

Identifying themes for specific pages is crucial. There is only so much room to expand on any existing keywords you have before it just becomes irrelevant to your site and won’t create any relevant traffic or visibility. An example that Search Engine Land suggests is instead of attempting to search for every possible, insanely-specific description of a shirt like “pink polka dotted yellow shirt”, look for other opportunities to branch out. For example, look into different types of shirts such as “sweaters”, “tees”, “blouses”, and so on.

Don’t: Keyword Stuffing.

This is exactly as it sounds, stuffing a bunch of the keyword you’re attempting to rank for in a particular page on your site. Don’t get us wrong; it’s essential to have those keywords on the pages you want to rank for that specific keyword. The key is to find that right amount of using that keyword where you’re still delivering high-quality content. Not only is this pretty unethical, but it also can look like spam and will be treated as such by Google or other search engines.

Do: Utilize meta descriptions.

A meta description is merely a short paragraph that appears on SERP (search engine results page). These can increase your click-through rate if you optimize your keyword in this location. The meta description has virtually nothing to do with ranking in web searches; however, it is helpful with click-through rate which will increase your ranking in the long run.

Don’t: Get caught up in your professional terminology.

This is extremely easy to do, and it can hurt your page ranking on SERP. This is because you can often forget to account for ways that a consumer without your technical knowledge might seek out your product or service. When deciding on keywords you want to target, remember to think like a consumer. For any of you that focus mostly on B2C sales, this is significantly important. An opportunity to take advantage of would be to do market research in focus groups to discover what consumers are wanting or needing your services would search.

Do: Monitor the impact of new keywords.

When adding new keywords, you want to make sure they are adding value to your account. A straightforward way to track this is to label new keywords as they are attached, this way you can quickly give a performance review, whether that be good or bad. Additionally, make sure that a keyword you have added is contributing positively while not taking away from existing keywords. If this is the case, make sure the performance of the account overall is increasing in strength.

Don’t: Duplicate keywords.

Duplicating keywords is another factor in keyword strategy that is a common mistake, but easily avoidable. Broad match keywords don’t rely on which order the terms are in, so keywords that would be considered duplicates are just words rearranged in a search. For example, “charcoal suit jacket” and “suit jacket charcoal” would be viewed as a duplicate and would also compete for the same search. The main thing here is you don’t want to be competing against yourself and spend more on clicks than necessary.

Contact Us

For more information regarding digital marketing expertise, trends and insights, visit the Onimod Global Website. We provide weekly news updates on the latest in the world of digital marketing. Enjoy!

Time to Spring Clean Your Digital Marketing?

Yesterday brought the official first day of spring – Now is the time to dust off the old and get your digital marketing sparkling like new! Read more

Goodbye Keyword Optimization — Welcome To The Age of Topical Optimization

Every business should have but one goal: to be an authority in its industry.

You might think the number one goal should be gaining new customers or making more sales. Obviously, that’s what any business wants. But businesses pursuing sales are often left in the dust by the businesses who are actively seeking to be industry authorities. That’s because sales and customers are like love — they are usually found when you’re not looking!

Many businesses succeed for a time by competing on price, but sooner or later, people realize they get what they pay for. Once that happens, they are gone, and the businesses pursues the next sucker.

The cost of keeping a customer is far, far, far (far, far) less than going out and getting a new one. That means getting people in with the lowest prices is going to kill your profits if you can’t keep them. And you’re only going to keep them by demonstrating, day in and day out, that you are the authority in what you do.

And all that starts with content.

When it comes to businesses, web searchers today are often looking primarily at two things: 1) customer reviews, and 2) authoritative content supplied by the business. The former is a reflection of the service you provide. The latter is a reflection of how well you “know your stuff.”

As we know, today’s search engine ranking algorithms have a heavy focus on content. We’ve always sought to optimize content with keywords, but now, keywords matter a whole lot less than actual topical authority.

But just how do you build that authority into your site?

If you said, “Content,” you’re half-right. Yes, content matters, but not just any content. Gone are the days of sites producing truckloads of “thin” content of little value. And gone are the days of optimizing any given page for keywords and hoping it will rank. Instead, search engines are looking for authoritative content that is more topically optimized than keyword-optimized.

Keyword Research Isn’t Dead

Keyword research is not dead

Many are proclaiming that keyword research is dead, and you might assume I’ve drawn the same conclusion. I haven’t. In fact, I think keyword research is more important now than ever, if we are going to write topically optimized content.

But the focus of our efforts isn’t on finding keywords just so they can be sprinkled into the site’s content. Instead, we focus on organizing the keywords into meaningful topical groups and considering searcher intent. From that, we are able to create meaningful, authoritative content.

My company, Pole Position Marketing, performs keyword research in two phases: 1) core term research, and 2) phrase research. If you get Phase 1 wrong, you’re going to have problems with Phase 2.

Essentially, core term research entails finding as many relevant keyword topics as possible. For example, if you sell salon products, your keyword topics might be shampoo, conditioner, hair color, hair dye, acrylic nails and so on. Each of those is a separate core term.

Once we have found all our topics, we can research each independently for a more lengthy list of phrases. For example, you might find “childrens shampoo,” “full body conditioner,” “permanent hair color,” “natural hair dye” and “acrylic nail kits.” That’s just a single example for each core term. Your keyword research is likely to produce a list of anywhere from 50 to thousands of phrases for each core term.

Obviously, not all the phrases you find will be relevant for your business, and those that are can’t all be included in a single piece of content. Any attempt to optimize a single piece of content for every relevant phrase is more likely going to end up diluting your content, rather than creating a single-focused authoritative piece.

Searcher Intent Determines The Content Focus

Searcher intent

One of the things you’re likely to find when sorting through all those keywords is that different keywords have different intents. Some searchers are looking for information, some are seeking out specific products and some are just beginning to see what’s out there and make comparisons. And surprisingly, some keywords are for a different product altogether.

For example, a keyword research for “acrylic nails” reveals a lot of different intents. Most searchers using that core term are looking for acrylic nails. No surprise there. But some are looking for designs, glitter, supplies, tips, kits, powder, polish, brushes, art and primer. The first thing to note here is that we’re likely not going to produce a page focused on all of these keywords. It’s just too broad.

So that means we have to divide these up. But we’re in luck, because searchers looking for “acrylic nail designs” have about 15 different ways for searching for that. Which means writing authoritative content on that topic shouldn’t be that difficult.

The same holds true for most of the other phrases mentioned above. Each produces a small list of keywords all narrowly focused on a subset of acrylic nail searches. Each one is worthy of a page of expert-knowledge content for either a page on your site or a blog post.

Topical Optimization Versus Keyword Optimization

Topical Optimization example

So far, we’ve talked pretty much about standard keyword optimization strategies. Maybe in the past, you felt that you could only optimize one keyword per page, or maybe you were already grouping keywords together like this. So where does the whole topical optimization come in?

Let’s go back to our salon store. We listed a number of different product lines offered on the site. Most businesses want immediate optimization for each category page on the site that represents those products. For our acrylic nail section, that would leave us with a handful of keywords for content focused on our most-searched group of phrases.

And that’s where most optimizers move on. They go from the Acrylic Nail category page to the Shampoo category page to the Conditioner category page and so on. The more product lines offered on a site, the more important it is to move on so that each product line gets authority content optimized for search.

But maybe moving on isn’t such a good idea. Maybe before we move on to the shampoos, we spend some more time on our acrylic nails. Take the time to optimize a page covering each of the keyword groups within the topic. For acrylic nails, this might mean optimizing more than 30 pages and blog posts. That builds up total topical dominance for a single topic.

Yeah, that means it may be a while before you get to the other products, but that’s okay. Better to have a single topic optimized to the hilt than to have 30 topics barely optimized. Why? Because by optimizing out the entire topic, you’re giving the search engines exactly what they want. Not only will you rank for hundreds of keyword phrases, you’ll also dominate for that topic. With one topic fully optimized, you’re ready to move on to the next.

Topical optimization doesn’t mean you have to have a single page or post that covers everything that needs to be said on the topic. Not only does that limit the number of entry points, it also doesn’t necessarily help searchers to land on the page that best represents their intent.

Instead of optimizing your site for keywords and hoping to rank here and there, focus on building the site out to dominate a topic with multiple pages and blog posts.

Each page or post will target a tightly correlated group of keywords, but all built around a slightly broader topic. That gives you a chance to dominate a topic through multiple related pages, each focused on a specific visitor intent. That’s tough to beat.

Topical Optimization

                                                                                                          H/T: Search Engine Land